Barcelona Chair

£6,192.00

Designed by Mies Van Der Rohe
Manufactured by Knoll

The Barcelona family includes a lounge chair, a daybed and a table.
The iconic Barcelona chair was designed in 1929, initially for the 1929 International exhibition’s German pavilion.

Lounge chair with base in steel hand-ground and hand-buffed to a mirror finish.
Seat belting straps made from cowhide, with seat and back pad in urethane foam with dacron polyester fibrefill, upholstered with 40 individual panels of leather which are hand cut, welted and tufted with leather and buttons made from a single hide.

Many more upholstery options available. Please enquire for further details.

  • Black (VOBLK)
  • White (VO785)
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Product Description

Polish chrome structure hand-buffed and hand-finished to a mirror finish. The cushions are upholstered with 40 individual panels cut, hand-welted and hand-tufted from a single hide. Seat and back cushions adapt to fit the curve of the frame. Side and edges of upholstery straps are dyed to match specified upholstery colour.

Dimensions
Height: 77cm x Width: 75cm x Depth: 77cm
Seat height: 43cm

Additional information

Delivery

Made-to-order: 6-8 weeks.
Orders over £1000 free for Mainland UK.
Non-Mainland UK and International options available.
Please enquire for further details.

Story

Such is the iconic status of the Barcelona chair that it has its own page in the Barcelona Yellow Pages. Not only that but it is one of the oldest modern classics still around. It was designed in 1929 for the Spanish Royal Family by the German designer Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. He came up with a set of pioneering designs in the search for a style that would be suitable for the modern industrial age. While many of his ideas remained unbuilt, in 1929 he was asked to design the German Pavilion for the Barcelona Exposition. As part of his design (a replica of which stands on the site today), he made two chairs for King Alfonso XIII and his wife, Ena, in case they required a rest while visiting. Mies drew his inspiration from an Egyptian folding chair and a Roman folding stool. It was supposed to bring to mind a throne. Unfortunately the royal couple never sat in the pavilion.